What is
angina
pectoris?

When
does angina occur?

Are
you
at risk?

How is
angina
treated?

Do you suffer from chest pain?

If you suffer from chest pain, it could be the result of a more serious underlying issue known as angina pectoris. Angina pectoris is the medical term for chest pain or discomfort usually due to coronary artery disease (CAD). Angina is typically treated with sublingual nitroglycerin administered at the onset of an attack.




Talk to your Doctor.

For more detailed information about angina treatment and CAD
risk factors, you should consult with your physician.



What is angina pectoris?

Angina pectoris is the medical term for chest pain or discomfort usually due to coronary artery disease (CAD). It occurs when the heart muscle doesn't get as much blood, and therefore as much oxygen, as it needs. This usually happens because one or more of the heart's arteries has become narrowed or blocked.

During a typical angina attack, a person feels uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing, or pain in the center of the chest. This discomfort may also be felt in the neck, jaw, shoulder, back, or arm.

To learn more about angina, click here.



When does angina occur?

Angina is a signal that the heart needs more blood. Exercise, strong emotions, or extreme temperatures can trigger an attack. Some people, such as those who experience coronary artery spasm, may have an angina attack even when they're resting.

Angina is usually a symptom of an underlying heart problem known as coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is the most common type of heart disease. If you’re at risk for CAD, you’re also at risk for angina.

If you suffer from CAD and require nitroglycerin for angina symptom relief,
click here.



Are you at risk?

The major risk factors for CAD include:

If you suffer from CAD and require nitroglycerin for angina symptom relief,
click here.



How is angina treated?

Nitrates are the medicines most commonly used to treat angina. They relax and widen blood vessels. This allows more blood to flow to the heart, while reducing the heart’s workload. Nitroglycerin is the most commonly used nitrate for angina. Nitroglycerin is most commonly prescribed as an oral dosage form (tablets or sprays), which is administered sublingually (on or under the tongue) at the onset of an angina attack. Several studies have shown that nitroglycerin sprays relieve angina symptoms faster than tablets.




All information was researched and constructed in accordance with publicly accessible information provided by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the American Heart Association (AHA).